[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 12, 1949

CLINICAL EVALUATION OF ISOPROPYLEPINEPHRINE IN MANAGEMENT OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

Author Affiliations

Baltimore

From The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Protein Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1949;139(7):452-457. doi:10.1001/jama.1949.72900240003008
Abstract

Within the past two years several reports have appeared covering the use of a new sympathomimetic amine in the symptomatic management of bronchial asthma.1 This isopropyl modification of epinephrine, racemic 1 - (3 -4 - dihydroxyphenyl)-2-isopropylaminoethanol, has been named variously "I.P.A." (Specific Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), "Aleudrin" in European literature, and "aludrine" in this country, "isorenin," now "isonorin" (Carroll Dunham Smith), and "isuprel" (Winthrop-Stearns, Inc.). The sulfate salt (aludrine sulfate) was the drug employed in the studies reported here. A purely clinical approach was used to evaluate the therapeutic effects of the drug and to assign it its proper place in the management of bronchial asthma. Four routes of administration were studied and an attempt made to determine the optimum dosage for each. The subjective and objective therapeutic effects of each method will be discussed separately. The patients treated in this series were selected from outpatient dispensary service, emergency room service, private practice

×