[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 28, 1956

PREDNISONE (METICORTEN) IN TREATMENT OF ACQUIRED HEMOLYTIC ANEMIAPRELIMINARY REPORT

JAMA. 1956;160(4):285-287. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960390035010a
Abstract

The demonstration that prednisone (Meticorten) could be used as effectively in the treatment of rheumatic diseases as cortisone without many of cortisone's undesirable side-effects suggested its trial in the treatment of acquired hemolytic anemia. It had been shown that corticosteroids depress the rate of hemolysis or diminish the titer of antibody, thus enabling the overly active erythropoiesis to reach a satisfactory equilibrium with the peripheral red blood cell count. Where long-term therapy is indicated, the elimination of sodium retention, hypertension, and diabetogenic effects of these drugs would be advantageous. The availability of prednisone in the past year has made possible the treatment of the following three cases of acquired hemolytic anemia.

REPORT OF CASES

Case 1.—A woman, aged 24, was first seen in 1950 with the acute onset of weakness, anorexia, and anemia of one week's duration. On admission to the hospital, pallor, icterus, and splenomegaly of 4 cm. below

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×