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Article
February 11, 1956

APLASTIC ANEMIA SECONDARY TO INTRAVENOUS THERAPY WITH RADIOGOLDREPORT OF A CASE

JAMA. 1956;160(6):461-463. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960410037009
Abstract

New therapeutic agents invariably introduce new hazards. The intravenous use of radiogold (Au198) is no exception. The intravenous administration of Au198 was the logical outcome of attempts to get the most effective doses of radioactivity to the reticuloendothelial organs, especially the liver and spleen, because of the known avidity of these tissues for gold. The purpose of this report is to call attention to deleterious consequences of the intravenous use of Au198.

A 60-year-old woman was first admitted to Cook County Hospital on July 17, 1953, because of weakness and swelling of the abdomen, with pain in the left lower quadrant. She had been well until three years before admission, when the signs and symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction developed. A cecostomy was performed in November, 1950. One month later, laparotomy revealed metastatic involvement of the liver. The primary lesion, which was in the rectosigmoid, was locally resected. In March,

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