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Article
March 3, 1956

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH A NEW MUSCLE RELAXANT, ZOXAZOLAMINEPRELIMINARY REPORT

JAMA. 1956;160(9):742-745. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960440014004
Abstract

• The degree of relaxation of voluntary muscles was scored by a method employing the electromyograph and was used in a comparison of several drugs. The most promising of the compounds studied was zoxazolamine, given orally in doses averaging 2 gm. daily with from 10 to 50 mg. of chlorpromazine.

This medication was administered to 28 patients with a variety of neurological disorders involving the voluntary muscles, particularly spasticity of the upper motor neuron type. The major benefit was the alleviation of the discomfort and inconvenience of the spasticity itself. Flexor spasms of the extremities were greatly reduced in those patients who had this as their most troublesome symptom. Without exception, however, all ambulatory patients whose spastic extremities were favorably affected by the combined drugs complained of greater weakness in those extremities, so that their ability to get about was impaired. Reduction of spasticity was not accompanied by improved volitional control.

Zoxazolamine had an advantage over drugs previously tried in being effective by mouth. Its principal role seemed to be to aid in nursing care, to increase the comfort of the patient, and to facilitate the work of the physical therapist in giving passive exercise.

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