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Article
March 17, 1956

CLINICAL NOTES

JAMA. 1956;160(11):967-968. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960460045009
Abstract

DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE BY BACTERIA 

EFFECT OF SERIAL SUBCULTURE IN ANTIBIOTIC MIXTURES  Norman Molomut, Ph.D.Leon J. Warshaw, M.D. and Elizabeth M. Gross, B.S., Port Washington, N. Y.The increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of micro-organisms and the corresponding increase of infections that fail to respond to treatment with any single antibiotic, even when large doses are used, has caused much concern in many quarters.1 The intensified search for new and more potent antibiotic agents provides some comfort, although it is evident that pathogenic micro-organisms will develop resistance to each new drug as it is introduced into general use.Physicians confronted by a seriously ill patient whose infection seems to defy first one, then another, and occasionally even a third antibiotic can rarely afford the time to try all of the currently available antibacterial drugs, much less wait for the discovery of newer ones. Some have used larger

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