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Article
April 14, 1956

A NEW INJECTOR DESIGNED TO MINIMIZE PAIN AND APPREHENSION OF PARENTERAL THERAPY

JAMA. 1956;160(15):1308-1310. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960500038011
Abstract

It has been 100 years since Alexander Wood first published his account of the use of the hypodermic syringe and hollow needle for injection of drugs through the skin. During this century, syringes and needles have been widely and extensively used. Today many of our drugs and methods of therapy and diagnosis would be impossible without them. When used properly, only slight pain is experienced when the skin is pierced by a needle, but there is nevertheless apprehension and considerable dislike for this method of treatment. Since hypodermic needles are often used on very young persons, they leave impressions on the minds of developing infants and children that are sometimes never erased. It is probable that doctor-patient relationships are profoundly and adversely influenced by these early painful injection experiences.

Because of the great number of patients of all ages who dislike or avoid injections, we have sought for a substitute

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