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Article
July 9, 1949

ON ALLERGY TO COTTONSEED OIL

JAMA. 1949;140(10):869-871. doi:10.1001/jama.1949.02900450019005
Abstract

The question of specific sensitiveness to edible cottonseed oil in contradistinction to cottonseed is worthy of recognition and more critical study than it has received. Discussions of cottonseed sensitiveness in textbooks on allergy generally imply that cutaneous sensitiveness to allergenic extracts of cottonseed or cottonseed meal signifies clinical sensitiveness to foods containing salad oil or vegetable shortening made from cottonseed oil. A pronounced difference of opinion concerning this concept is displayed in the testimony of six allergists who appeared as expert witnesses at a public hearing1 in relation to label declaration of vegetable oils in salad dressings.

Opportunity to study allergy to cottonseed oil is rare.1 Hence, worthy of record are results of a concurrent comparison of two cottonseed-sensitive allergic subjects, one of whom disclaimed and the other proclaimed a demonstrable sensitiveness to edible cottonseed oil.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  A male asthmatic patient (S.), age 34,

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