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July 27, 1940

STUDIES IN BLOOD PRESERVATION:THE SHAPE OF THE CONTAINER

JAMA. 1940;115(4):290. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.72810300004007b
Abstract

Following a preliminary report on the shape of the container as a factor in blood preservation,1 various flasks have been tested out at the Presbyterian Hospital. A special receptacle2 designed with a narrow center section allows the interface forming between the cells and the plasma to settle in the constricted portion. The results, judged by the retardation of both potassium and hemoglobin diffusion from the cells, have been so satisfactory as to lead to its adoption.

If the blood is not used within a week, the supernatant plasma is removed by suction and the plasma stored in the second bottle. Saline solution is added to bring the surface of the plasma up into the neck of the flask. This accomplishes a dual purpose. The addition of the saline solution tends to keep the fibrin in solution, and the reduction of the interface retards surface denaturation.

The stability of

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