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October 5, 1940

REDUCTION OF ELEVATED BLOOD PRESSURE BY ADMINISTRATION OF RENAL EXTRACTS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE; NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tenn., and the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore.

JAMA. 1940;115(14):1169-1176. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810400021004
Abstract

A number of investigators have claimed beneficial results from the administration of renal extract. The earliest studies were those of Brown-Séquard and d'Arsonval1 in 1892 and of Meyer2 the following year. These authors reported that nephrectomized animals were improved by their crude extracts. More recently it has been stated3 that renal venous blood contains a substance which in animals causes diuresis, with reduction in the amount of sodium, chloride, potassium and urea in the blood. It has likewise been claimed4 that extracts of the kidney cause diuresis and reduction of blood pressure in patients with nephritis. These therapeutic claims have not been confirmed nor have they received any serious consideration by competent authorities for a number of reasons. In the first place the hypotensive action claimed for these extracts has not been demonstrated in hypertensive animals. Secondly, the clinical data have not been convincing. In most

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