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October 26, 1940

ASTHMATIC BRONCHITIS FOLLOWING CHRONIC UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION: A FIVE YEAR STUDY OF 235 CONSECUTIVE CASES SEEN IN PRIVATE PRACTICE

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

JAMA. 1940;115(17):1434-1436. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810430024007
Abstract

In the presentation of this material I do not wish to disparage the study of bronchitis of allergic origin but to call attention to the frequency of chronic infection of the upper respiratory tract especially when accompanied by bronchitis with wheezing, which is subsequently referred to as asthmatic bronchitis. This clinical entity occurs frequently in pediatric practice and I shall attempt to define it and to show that it is primarily an infectious process. In a review of recent medical literature1 and in textbooks2 it seems to be considered a part of asthma, but while it may occur in the asthmatic child it would seem distinct and different from allergy unless bacterial hypersensitiveness may be considered an allergic phenomenon.

Any group of symptoms which distinctly impair the health of the child certainly should be honored as a clinical entity. When chronic upper respiratory infection becomes severe enough to

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