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October 26, 1940

FAILURE OF GELATIN OR AMINO-ACETIC ACID TO INCREASE THE WORK ABILITY: OF INDIVIDUAL NORMAL HUMAN MUSCLES

Author Affiliations

DETROIT

From the Department of Physiology, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1940;115(17):1439-1441. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810430029010
Abstract

The observation that gelatin was an effective agent in postponing human fatigue was made by Ray and his co-workers1 in a now widely publicized paper which appeared in February 1939. To date no confirmation of this action of gelatin has appeared. Ray theorized that gelatin postponed fatigue by an action on the muscles themselves. He reasoned that creatine was a substance important in muscle chemistry, one of whose precursors in the body may be aminoacetic acid (glycocoll, glycine). Aminoacetic acid makes up 25 per cent by weight of gelatin. An added supply of aminoacetic acid was thought to increase the store of creatine in the muscles. If this is the mechanism by which gelatin acts, the effect should show up in increased work ability of a single human muscle during a period of gelatin or aminoacetic acid ingestion. Further, if gelatin has any action on fatigue its ingestion should

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