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October 26, 1940

CLINICAL CONTRACEPTIVE RESULTS IN A SMALL SERIES OF PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; MILTON, MASS.

From the National Committee on Maternal Health, Inc., 2 East One Hundred and Third Street, New York.

JAMA. 1940;115(17):1451-1454. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.72810430011013
Abstract

In 1933 a metropolitan general hospital inaugurated a limited contraceptive service for obstetric patients. The department was not equipped to provide methods requiring individual fitting and believed that a simpler method might have wider acceptance than diaphragm and jelly and thus facilitate child spacing for a larger proportion of patients. Of the simple methods then available, jelly used alone seemed the most promising. A lactic acid jelly1 was selected on the basis of apparently satisfactory clinical use elsewhere. This was offered to patients at cost, 20 cents for a tube of jelly and 10 cents for an applicator. In order that they might know of alternative and supplementary methods which might provide greater protection than jelly alone the patients were also given information on the greater effectiveness of condom plus jelly, on the low risk days of the menstrual cycle and on the location of an extramural clinic where

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