[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
November 2, 1940

CHRONIC FRIEDLÄNDER INFECTIONS OF THE LUNGS: REPORT OF SEVENTEEN CASES AND OBSERVATIONS ON THERAPY WITH SULFAPYRIDINE AND SULFANILAMIDE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Fourth Medical Division of Bellevue Hospital, Dr. Charles H. Nammack, director, and the Dr. Simon Baruch Foundation for Research.

JAMA. 1940;115(18):1527-1536. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810440019005
Abstract

In a recent communication I reported a series of cases of acute Friedländer pneumonia, giving reasons for considering this disease as a distinct and primary form of pneumonia.1 Before proceeding to a description of chronic lung infections caused by the Freidländer bacillus (Bacillus mucosus capsulatus), the essential features of the acute disease will be reviewed briefly.

In common with other pneumonias, the onset is usually sudden, with chills, fever, cough and pain. The clinical course, however, is fulminating and the mortality extremely high. Certain other features serve further to distinguish Friedländer pneumonia from other forms:

  1. Pneumonia due to the Friedländer bacillus comprises from 1 to 3 per cent of all pneumonias and occurs almost exclusively in the later decades of life with a considerable preponderance of males over females. It almost never occurs in children.

  2. Hemoptysis is a frequent initial symptom in this disease. Herpes is uncommon,

×