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November 9, 1940

THE EFFECTS OF REPEATED ANOXIA ON THE BRAIN: A HISTOPATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

Captain, Medical Corps Reserve, U. S. Army RANDOLPH FIELD, TEXAS; PHILADELPHIA

From the School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph Field, Texas, and the Laboratories of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1940;115(19):1595-1600. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810450009003
Abstract

The effect of oxygen deprivation on the nervous system, and particularly the brain, has become a problem of great practical significance in recent years. The rapid progress of aeronautical engineering with the production of planes with high ceilings and rapid rates of climb has brought many of these problems to the fore. Another situation, only numerically less important, exists in the industrial and physiologic laboratory in which experimenters subject themselves repeatedly to conditions of oxygen lack. These two examples of repeated anoxia stimulated the initiation of the work reported here, in which an attempt was made to determine in guinea pigs and cats the nature and extent of the histopathologic changes which may occur in the brain after a single and after repeated periods of pure anoxia.

In order to function properly, the nervous system must have an adequate oxygen supply. There are several avenues open to explain this fact,

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