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November 9, 1940

HYPOTHERMIASUBNORMAL TEMPERATURE AND ITS RELATION TO NEUROCIRCULATORY ASTHENIA (SOLDIER'S HEART)

JAMA. 1940;115(19):1606-1609. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810450020006
Abstract

Over a period of several years, persons without obvious infection or organic disease whose average temperature was slightly but continuously higher than the usually accepted normal were selected for special study.1 Of twenty persons studied, seventeen were women. Most of them had been suspected for months or years of having some obscure underlying infection or other disease to account for the "fever" and many had been needlessly subjected to prolonged expensive investigation or treatment to discover the cause. Because of the elevated temperature the condition was at first regarded as habitual hyperthermia, but it soon became evident that in most cases the "fever" was only one factor among many others which occur in certain so-called neurotic persons. Furthermore, most of the neurotic patients had signs and symptoms of syndromes commonly known as sympathicotonia or vagotonia, chiefly the former, or a combination of the two. It was also pointed out

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