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November 9, 1940

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF TUBERCULOSIS

JAMA. 1940;115(19):1609-1614. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810450023007
Abstract

In the long known nations, such as China, Egypt and Greece, consumption was described soon after man began to make permanent records. Where the disease originated we do not know, but its contagiousness was early suspected. As transportation developed, first through the use of beasts of burden and marching armies, then by sailboats, steamships, railroads, automobiles and finally airplanes, the disease was carried by persons in whom it was unsuspected and by persons who sought recovery of health from an ocean voyage or a change of climate.

For a long time there remained parts of the world where tuberculosis did not exist in man or animals. As it was carried to these places it spread among the natives, as it must have originally done in the long civilized countries. In some places it appeared in epidemic form, as manifested by illness of its victims. In all places it was in

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