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November 23, 1940

FATAL HEMORRHAGE FROM PEPTIC ULCER: ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN CASES COLLECTED FROM VITAL STATISTICS OF SEATTLE DURING THE YEARS 1935-1939 INCLUSIVE

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE

From the Mason Clinic.

JAMA. 1940;115(21):1774-1779. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810470018005
Abstract

The mortality risk of hemorrhage from peptic ulcer has been reported by various observers1 as varying from a fraction of 1 per cent to as high as 74 per cent, the last figure reported by Chiesman2 in a selected group of recurring hemorrhages. Allen3 and Blackford and Cole4 reported simultaneously (1937) that in older persons having massive exsanguinating hemorrhage the mortality rate approximated 30 per cent in their hospital practice and that age was the greatest factor influencing mortality.

Recent reports of mortality rates of from 1 to 2 per cent for hemorrhage from peptic ulcer when under special medical treatments have been made by Meulengracht,5 Andreson6 and others; and Hurst7 feels that a death in private practice from hemorrhage from ulcer is rare. On the other hand, Hinton,8 Goldman,9 Crohn10 and many others report higher mortality rates, often much

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