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November 23, 1940

RECURRENT PEPTIC ULCER: SITUATION OF RECURRENCES AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STUDIES OF PAIN IN THE RECOGNITION OF SUCH RECURRENCES

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Medicine, the Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1940;115(21):1779-1785. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810470023006
Abstract

Peptic ulcer is among the most frequent of the organic causes of gastronomic unhappiness, and pain is the most consistent among the complaints of patients who have this disease. Not only is the proper evaluation of pain important in the recognition of peptic ulcerative disease, but much regarding the histopathologic condition of such a lesion can be determined by a critical study of the type, situation and reference of the pain present. Although there is a fairly consistent reduplication of characteristics in the symptomatology of peptic ulcer, there is nevertheless considerable variability in the complaints which patients who have this disease will volunteer. This variability seems reasonable when it is considered that, as peptic ulcer invades successive depths of tissue, definite changes in symptomatology may well occur. As neighboring organs are involved and as normal physiologic processes become increasingly disturbed, symptoms might well arise which would substitute for or complicate

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