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November 23, 1940

CHALK GOUT: A REPORT OF TWO CASES WITH A BRIEF SUMMARY OF SOME PREVIOUSLY REPORTED STUDIES ON CALCINOSIS

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Medicine, the Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.

JAMA. 1940;115(21):1791-1794. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810470035008
Abstract

The term "chalk gout" is occasionally used to designate a rare disease more generally known as "calcinosis circumscripta." In this condition calcium stones develop in the skin in the vicinity of peripheral joints.

Extensive reviews of the subject of calcinosis have been published during the past two decades: in Germany by Steinitz,1 in America by Durham2 and by Rothstein and Welt,3 in France by Weissenbach and his co-workers4 and in England by Atkinson and Weber5 and by Brooks.6 The first report of this disease in modern medical literature appeared in 1877 (Teissier7). However, Holländer8 has republished a curious record dated 1654 in which reference is made to a probable instance of this disease.

Steinitz distinguished two clinical types of calcinosis: (1) a circumscribed variety in which the calcium concretions are confined almost exclusively to the regions of the terminal phalanges of the

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