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December 7, 1940

USE OF CELLOPHANE CYLINDERS FOR DESICCATING BLOOD PLASMA: A RAPID, ECONOMICAL AND BACTERIOLOGICALLY SAFE METHOD

Author Affiliations

Detroit

From the Department of Laboratories, Henry Ford Hospital.

JAMA. 1940;115(23):1989-1990. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.72810490001009
Abstract

The present day use of blood banks and the tendency toward the use of stored blood and blood plasma have emphasized the importance of methods for preserving the plasma. At constant low temperatures liquid plasma may be stored safely for a number of months, but such conditions are difficult and expensive to maintain. Storage of large quantities of liquid under these exacting conditions is best accomplished only in stationary units, so that the mobility necessary for military or other emergency uses presents further expensive obstacles.

As pointed out by Flosdorf and Mudd1 in 1935, the desiccation of serum was successfully accomplished by C. Martin in 1896, by M. J. Rosenau in 1895, by Noguchi in 1907 and by Burrows and Cohn in 1918. But all these methods produced physicochemical changes in the material and a poorly soluble end product. Shackell in 1909 first introduced the process of desiccation by

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