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December 30, 1950

ACTION OF LIPOTROPIC SUBSTANCES IN LIVER DISEASE AS MEASURED BY RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS

JAMA. 1950;144(18):1566-1567. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.02920180030008
Abstract

The liver is an organ of many functions. Tests have been designed to measure alterations in function in hepatic disease, but these tests are often relatively crude and do not detect small decreases in activity. No test has been devised which can assay the functional capacity of the liver for some activities which are known to exist. Until recently, for example, no means had been developed to measure new phospholipids entering the blood, though it has been known for some time that the blood phospholipids are derived almost entirely from those formed in the liver.1 The synthesis of phospholipids is a function of primary importance to the body and cannot be measured by a chemical method. The application of an isotopic technic to this problem makes possible the accurate measurement of the excess, over their normal breakdown and catabolism, of newly synthesized substances which incorporate the labeled atoms of

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