[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 52.200.130.163. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 21, 1940

ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION AND ORTHOSTATIC TACHYCARDIA: TREATMENT WITH THE "HEAD-UP" BED

JAMA. 1940;115(25):2162-2167. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810510038010
Abstract

Orthostatic hypotension is characterized chiefly by a sharp decrease in blood pressure when a patient afflicted with it stands. The blood pressure is ordinarily normal when the patient lies. If the blood pressure decreases to a low level, weakness and syncope result. Other relevant signs or symptoms are deficient sweating, either localized or generalized, secretion of larger amounts of urine when the patient is recumbent than when he is erect and in some cases a failure of the pulse rate to increase markedly when the patient assumes the erect posture. Orthostatic hypotension should be suspected whenever a patient has exhaustion in the morning which lessens during the day, whenever weakness, dimness of vision or syncope occurs on assumption of the erect posture and disappears on lying down, whenever episodes of syncope are inadequately explained and whenever there is diminished sweating. This condition has been considered by some to be the

×