[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
January 6, 1951

ROLE OF TRANSFUSIONS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GASTRIC HEMORRHAGE

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, University of Michigan Medical School.

JAMA. 1951;145(1):22-26. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920190024007
Abstract

When a sudden, large hemorrhage occurs from peptic ulcer, there is usually a fall in blood pressure as a result of an abrupt reduction in the circulating blood volume. This initial fall in blood pressure, if not too great, may be of benefit in preventing further hemorrhage. Blood clots more rapidly after a severe hemorrhage, and this plus the low blood pressure is usually effective in sealing the leak even in large vessels. In the case of arteries, retraction of the middle fibromuscular coat and curling of the endothelial lining are further defenses against bleeding.1 If these natural mechanisms fail for some reason (for example, arteriosclerosis or erosion of a main artery) there will be continuing hemorrhage or recurrent hemorrhage with persistent shock; such patients face the dangers of anoxemia of vital organs resulting in death. The role of blood transfusion therapy in hemorrhage from peptic ulcer consists first

×