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January 13, 1951

RECENT ADVANCES IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF DEFICIENCY DISEASES

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Head of the Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1951;145(2):66-72. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920200006003
Abstract

For the past twenty years I have been interested in the relationship of diet to disease. Great advances have been made in the recognition of dietary deficiences, and dramatic results have been observed following the persistent application of adequate amounts of specific therapeutic agents. The number of cases of pellagra, beriberi, scurvy and rickets has been decreased dramatically; in fact, these diseases have been almost eradicated from the United States.

My experience in the diagnosis of nicotinic acid (niacin) deficiency, ascorbic acid deficiency, thiamine deficiency and riboflavin deficiency recently has been discussed at considerable length.1 I realize that the methods of diagnosis and treatment described are still not perfect, but they are the best available and I can recommend no better means of relieving persons with deficiency disease. It is obvious that an accurate diagnosis is essential for proper treatment. Yet, after twenty years of concentrated study in this

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