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March 3, 1951

INTRAVENOUS USE OF AMINO ACIDS AFTER INJURY

JAMA. 1951;145(9):650. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920270044015
Abstract

An increase in the rate of tissue protein breakdown is one of the oldest known features of the metabolic changes after injury. As a corollary to this well established observation is the problem as to whether any build-up of tissue protein occurs at the same time. Some workers believe that injury actually inhibits tissue protein synthesis, a view which is usually expressed as the "antianabolic theory." If this theory is correct, one may rightly infer that there is no use giving protein food to patients after acute injury. If the amino acids from the fed protein are all deaminized and used as a source of energy, it is argued, why not limit the food intake to dextrose (and fat)? This question is especially important in patients whose intake must be limited to the intravenous channel, for in such cases as simple a regimen as possible has many practical advantages.

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