[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.226.244.70. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
March 17, 1951

AIR STERILIZATION IN AN INFANTS' WARD: EFFECT OF TRIETHYLENE GLYCOL VAPOR AND DUST-SUPPRESSIVE MEASURES ON THE RESPIRATORY CROSS INFECTION RATE

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Pediatrics, New York University-Bellevue Medical Center. Presented before the Society for Pediatric Research at the Twentieth Annual Meeting, French Lick, Ind., May 8, 1950.

JAMA. 1951;145(11):775-780. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920290001001
Abstract

The control of respiratory cross infections in infants' wards has always presented a serious problem.1 Since the introduction of gamma globulin, sulfonamides and antibiotics this problem has become less acute. Nevertheless, there are still far too many respiratory tract infections—bacterial, viral and of unknown cause— which are acquired after admission to a hospital ward.

The relative importance of contact versus air-borne infection has not been established. However, in recent years the air-borne mode of transmission has received much emphasis.2 The study to be described is concerned with two measures for the control of air-borne infection—use of triethylene glycol vapor and dust suppression by oiling.

Triethylene glycol vapor possesses marked bactericidal and virucidal properties against a variety of airborne micro-organisms. Robertson and his associates3 demonstrated that it was rapidly lethal for hemolytic streptococci, pneumococci, staphylococci, influenza bacilli and the PR8 strain of influenza virus. Rosebury and his associates

×