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March 31, 1951

LOCAL TACTICAL PLANNING AND LOGISTICS IN MEDICAL ASPECTS OF CIVIL DEFENSE

Author Affiliations

Baltimore

From the Department of Preventive Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1951;145(13):979-983. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.72920310006010
Abstract

A realistic point of view must permeate all local tactical planning and the logistics of civil defense. The development of guided missiles, long range bombers and the atomic bomb places every area in this country within range of a possible enemy attack. Thus, the philosophies and concepts of civil defense that were developed in the United States during World War II must be radically altered. Instead of plans being made in terms of incidents and disasters involving scores or hundreds of casualties, the medical divisions of civil defense organizations have to be organized and supplied in some way so that, if called on, they will be able to cope with many thousands or even hundreds of thousands of casualties.

In World War II, civil defense organizations were concerned primarily with their role in disaster relief of various types in their own community. Now, it appears definite that a properly centered

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