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April 14, 1951

SPONTANEOUS COMPRESSION OF THE MEDIAN NERVE AT THE WRIST

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

From the Cleveland Clinic and the Frank E. Bunts Educational Institute.

JAMA. 1951;145(15):1128-1133. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920330018006
Abstract

Pain and numbness in the fingers are relatively common complaints. These symptoms are usually of secondary importance and hardly worthy of the physician's serious consideration. There are many patients, however, who come to the physician specifically for relief from pain and numbness in their hands, and who have no other complaints whatsoever. This group of patients often presents a difficult problem in differential diagnosis.

Obviously, pain and hypesthesia in the fingers may be produced by any lesion involving the nerve pathways to the hand. This may be a lession of the central nervous system, such as a brain tumor, syringomyelia or a degenerative disease of the spinal cord. Much more frequently, however, the lesion is found to be one which produces irritation of the fifth to eighth cervical nerve roots. A protruded cervical intervertebral disk, hypertrophic arthritis of the cervical spine and injuries involving the cervical roots are commoner causes

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