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May 19, 1951

SELF-ADMINISTRATION OF A MERCURIAL DIURETIC: EXPERIENCE OF PATIENTS WITH MERCAPTOMERIN (THIOMERIN®) SODIUM

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Medicine, New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College, New York.

JAMA. 1951;146(3):250-253. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670030028010
Abstract

Since it was first discovered that certain mercurial compounds had diuretic properties, continuous progress has been made in finding new chemical variants which were more effective but less toxic. Mercaptomerin (thiomerin®) sodium is one of the preparations developed more recently. It combines sodium thioglycollate, a monosulfhydryl compound, with an organic mercurial to form the disodium salt of N (γ-carboxymethyl mercaptomercuri-β-methoxy) propyl camphoramic acid. The results of clinical observations carried out by Stewart, McCoy, Shepard and Luckey,1 Herrmann, Chriss, Hejtmancik, and Sims,2 Grossman, Weston, Edelman, and Leiter,3 Winik and Benedict4 and Enselberg and Simmons5 have shown that mercaptomerin sodium is an effective diuretic not only when given intramuscularly and intravenously but also when given subcutaneously. There are many patients with cardiac disease who require frequent and regular injections of mercurial diuretics to maintain compensation and an ambulatory status. The fact that mercaptomerin sodium is effective when

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