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June 16, 1951

HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCIC SORE THROAT: CORTISONE IN THE TREATMENT OF THE POSTSTREPTOCOCCIC STATE

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Medicine, United States Marine Hospital, Staten Island, N. Y.; Chief of Medicine (Dr. Doerner); Deputy Chief of Medicine (Dr. Naegele); Senior Medical Resident (Dr. Regan).

JAMA. 1951;146(7):641-643. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.63670070001009
Abstract

Patients suffering from hemolytic streptococcic infection of the respiratory tract frequently develop a variety of disorders as a complication of their illness. Skin manifestations, polyarthritis, involvement of the heart and its structures, persistent fever, general toxicity, and nephritis may develop in from three to 30 days after the respiratory infection begins.

It has been noted1a that in approximately 20% of such respiratory tract illnesses, a disorder supervened which could not be explained on the basis of increased reaction of the primary inflammatory site or as a result of invasion of remote tissues by the hemolytic Streptococcus. These complicating nonsuppurative sequelae of hemolytic Streptococcus disease have been referred to as the poststreptococcic state. It has been suggested that this state occurs not as the result of the primary etiological agent per se, but rather as a more complex mechanism by which the patient's tissues have been sensitized to some fraction

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