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June 23, 1951

SPONTANEOUS CEREBROSPINAL RHINORRHEA WITH REMISSION FOLLOWING DYE INJECTION

Author Affiliations

Little Rock, Ark.

JAMA. 1951;146(8):728-729. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.63670080002009a
Abstract

Spontaneous cerebrospinal rhinorrhea is a rare disease. Coleman and Troland1 defined spontaneous or idiopathic rhinorrhea as the discharge of spinal fluid that occurs through the nose in the absence of (1) trauma to the head, (2) infections of the bones of the paranasal sinuses, (3) tumors eroding the base of the cranium, (4) prolonged increased cerebrospinal pressure, and (5) demonstrable congenital anomalies. They found only 12 cases in the literature since 1920, and only two additional cases were found in the literature by me. Cloward and Cunningham2 reported one case, of four months in duration, affecting the left side. Surgical intervention was instituted, and the flow stopped. The other case, of nine months in duration, in which infection was the mode of onset, was reported by Love and Gay.3 In this case, also, surgical intervention was instituted, and the flow stopped. Love and Gay reported two other

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