[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 7, 1951

OBSERVATIONS ON CLINICAL ASPECTS OF HYSTERIA: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF 50 HYSTERIA PATIENTS AND 156 CONTROL SUBJECTS

Author Affiliations

Milwaukee; St. Louis; Boston

From the Department of Psychiatry of the Tufts College Medical School (Graduate Division) and the Departments of Medicine and Obstetrics of the Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1951;146(10):902-909. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670100022006
Abstract

Hysteria ([unk]στέρα) has been noted by physicians since antiquity,1 but no consistent clinical picture to accompany this term has clearly emerged from the medical literature. The study reported here was undertaken for the further investigation of clinical observations that suggested that hysteria as seen in hospitals in New England presents a rather definite clinical picture. The study was undertaken for the determination, first, whether the clinical impression of the relatively constant pattern of hysteria was a true impression; secondly, to provide factual data that might be useful to the clinician in the diagnosis of hysteria, and thirdly, to provide a sound clinical basis for further research in hysteria.

SELECTION OF PATIENTS WITH HYSTERIA  The patients selected for this study were 50 women with hysteria examined in a diagnostic hospital in New England. All patients admitted to the hospital were referred by their own physicians as presenting diagnostic problems for

×