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July 21, 1951

CARDIAC ACCIDENTS FOLLOWING VASOPRESSIN INJECTION (PITRESSIN®)

Author Affiliations

Milwaukee; Wood, Wis.

From the Veterans Hospital, Wood, Wis., and the Marquette University School of Medicine, Milwaukee.

JAMA. 1951;146(12):1126-1129. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.63670120002009a
Abstract

Vasopressin injection (pitressin®) has become widely accepted as a useful aid in roentgen visualization of the gallbladder. Through its ability to increase peristalsis, vasopressin injection results in rapid expulsion of gas from the intestine, thus removing obscuring gas shadows. The drug may cause only transient and minor toxic reactions. Collins and Root1 recognized three contraindications: coronary heart disease, hypertension and hypotension (systolic blood pressure under 100). Kirklin2 in reporting on the use of vasopressin injection in 100 cases, noted no serious ill effects although numerous minor reactions were observed, the most frequent being pallor. Recently, Mills and co-workers3 directed attention to the possibility of serious myocardial effects of the drug. We observed two cardiac accidents following vasopressin injection during cholecystography. On the basis of generally accepted principles governing its use, no contraindication to the use of the drug was evident in these cases.

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