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August 11, 1951

EFFECT OF COMBINED SYMPATHECTOMY AND VAGECTOMY ON THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

Author Affiliations

Boston

Dr. Bingham is now associated with Toronto Western Hospital, Bathurst Street, Toronto, Canada.; From the Robert Dawson Evans Memorial, Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals, and the Departments of Medicine and Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1951;146(15):1406-1408. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.63670150001012
Abstract

Clinical, radiologic and motility studies were made of a group of six patients before and after combined sympathectomy and vagectomy. These studies suggest that combined interruption of both sympathetic and parasympathetic impulses to the stomach, small bowel, and proximal colon produces minor changes in many functions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

The vagectomy was performed in each case for duodenal ulcer. In five, the sympathectomy was carried out for essential hypertension, and in the sixth, for the relief of intractable pain. The extent and chronology of the operations were as follows:

In cases 1-4, bilateral splanchnicectomy and ganglionectomy from the second to the 12th thoracic segment was done and transthoracic supradiaphragmatic vagectomy was performed at the second stage of sympathectomy.

In case 5, bilateral splanchnicectomy and ganglionectomy from the ninth thoracic to the second lumbar segment, was done in 1943, and transthoracic supradiaphragmatic vagectomy, in 1946.

In case 6, bilateral

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