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September 1, 1951

ATOMIC BOMB INJURY: RADIATION

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

Chief, Medical Branch, Division of Biology and Medicine, United States Atomic Energy Commission, Washington 25, D. C. (Dr. Dunham); Commander, Medical Corps, United States Navy, Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda 14, Md. (Dr. Cronkite); Assistant Professor of Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, and Consultant, Division of Biology and Medicine, United States Atomic Energy Commission (Dr. Le Roy); Director, Division of Biology and Medicine, United States Atomic Energy Commission (Dr. Warren).

JAMA. 1951;147(1):50-54. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.73670180011011
Abstract

The syndrome of acute radiation injury to be considered in this article is the term applied to the symptom complex, or diseased state, which results from exposure of the whole body or a major portion of it to the initial nuclear radiation of an atomic bomb. This term should be clearly distinguished from irradiation sickness, which is commonly used to describe the symptom complex resulting from therapeutic irradiation. It should also be distinguished from surface radiation injury. This term is properly applied to injuries of the skin and subcutaneous tissues resulting from x-radiation or from contact or near contact with radioactive material, such as fission products and induced radioactivity. Injuries of this type related to atomic energy are due largely to beta-ray-emitting isotopes. Internal radiation injury may result from the selective deposition, such as in bone or thyroid, of radioactive material that has been inhaled or absorbed through the gastrointestinal

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