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September 22, 1951

RETICULUM CELL SARCOMA OF MESENTERY: CASE WITH PRONOUNCED FEBRILE MANIFESTATIONS

Author Affiliations

San Antonio, Tex.; Pittsburgh

Dr. W. J. Winter, Assistant Chief of the Pathology Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Aspinwall, Pa., gave suggestions and advice.

JAMA. 1951;147(4):316-318. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.73670210009007c
Abstract

Jackson and Parker1 found that pronounced fever was rare in reticulum cell sarcoma unless associated with sepsis. Gall and Mallory2 noted that fever of 101 F. or higher occurred at some time during the course of the disease in all the malignant lymphomas, but was relatively uncommon in clasmatocytic (25%) and stem cell (29%) lymphomas.

Gall and Mallory,2 in offering a different classification of malignant lymphomas in a study of 618 cases, divided the specimens into seven categories. The "reticulum cell sarcomas" were divided into two types: (1) stem cell lymphomas (tumors composed of highly undifferentiated, supposedly pluripotential cells, called stem cells) and (2) clasmatocytic lymphomas (tumors made up of fairly well differentiated cells, simulating normal clasmatocytes or monocytes, the cells being smaller than stem cells, but distinctly larger than lymphocytes). The other five categories of malignant lymphoma are (3) lymphoblastic lymphoma, (4) lymphocytic lymphoma, (5) Hodgkins

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