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October 13, 1951

ALLERGY THERAPY: SOME COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1951;147(7):617-620. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670240001001
Abstract

CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

Much progress in research is needed to improve and extend benefit to the 10 million or more allergic persons in this country. Nevertheless, with full utilization of present knowledge and methods the majority of these can be benefited. Only a small percentage of these are receiving the full benefit of available therapy. There are a number of reasons why the remaining millions fail to obtain results, and most important among these reasons is the fact that misconceptions concerning etiology, diagnosis, and therapy are prevalent both in the ranks of the medical profession and among the public. Full correction of these false notions and complete utilization of present-day knowledge of allergy can only come as a result of proper education of the profession,1 beginning with student days and continuing later, and with the education of the public through adequate channels.2 Here I can only discuss briefly some

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