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October 27, 1951

RESPONSE OF PLASMODIUM MALARIAE INFECTIONS TO THREE DIFFERENT DRUGS: RESPONSE TO METACHLORIDINE, CHLOROGUANIDE ("PALUDRINE"), AND INTRAMUSCULAR CHLOROQUINE

Author Affiliations

Columbia, S. C.

From the South Carolina State Hospital (Dr. McLendon), and the Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Microbiological Institute, Laboratory of Tropical Diseases (Dr. Young).

JAMA. 1951;147(9):822-823. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670260024007
Abstract

In the search for more efficient drugs in the treatment of Plasmodium malariae, the causative agent of quartan malaria, tests were made with metachloridine, chloroguanide hydrochloride and intramuscular chloroquine.

Metachloridine, a sulfonamide with the formula N1-(5-chloro-2-pyrimidyl) metanilamide, was found in a field study by Kenney and Brackett1 (1947) to suppress natural infections of P. malariae.

At the time the work reported here was started, the few scattered reports (Fairley,2 Afridi,3 Jafar,4 Parekh and Boghani,5 and Viswanathan and Baily6) on the treatment of P. malariae with chloroguanide gave results ranging from satisfactory to unsatisfactory or inconclusive, the latter owing to the small number of cases or lack of adequate data.

The action of chloroquine diphosphate given orally against our strain of P. malariae infections has been reported previously.7 Later, Culwell and others8 (1948) and Spicknall and others9 (1949) found that chloroquine administered

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