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November 10, 1951

MASS BLOOD TYPING: SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS OF THE JACKSON, MICH., BLOOD TYPING PROGRAM

Author Affiliations

Jackson, Mich.

From the pathological laboratories of W. A. Foote Memorial and Mercy hospitals.

JAMA. 1951;147(11):1034-1036. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670280036011
Abstract

The problem of mass blood typing of entire communities has been the source of considerable debate and disagreement, and many arguments have been raised as to the advisability or inadvisability of such a project. The medical profession as a whole has never taken a stand in favor of such a program, and whatever opinions were expressed by spokesmen of medical organizations were decidedly opposed to it.1 The arguments brought forth by either side were for the most part based on personal opinions, all of which undoubtedly had their merits. The present article, which is a brief review and analysis of the Jackson, Mich., Mass Blood Typing Program, is not an attempt to solve the problem one way or another, but, by bringing actual facts and figures, an attempt to answer some of the questions which have arisen in this debate. These questions deal particularly with the physical possibilities of

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