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November 24, 1951

MEDICAL AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF POPULATION—TRENDS AND IMPLICATIONS: CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Frank Billings Medical Clinic, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1951;147(13):1187-1190. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670300001001
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to call attention to some of the broader aspects of medicine, particularly those associated with changes in the size and age structure of the population in different areas of the world. These problems vary widely. In the United States, the total population is aging and is still increasing in size, although a downward trend is probable within the foreseeable future; Asia struggles with difficulties arising out of multitudes she cannot easily support; Western Europe is faced with long-time trends threatening a decline in population. The social scientists have studied these conditions carefully; responsibility for action in an enlightened society lies with the individual members and groups.

As man has progressed from the dawn of civilization, his primary concern has always been survival: survival of the individual and survival of the group. This has also been medicine's primary function; life, health and relief of suffering

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