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November 24, 1951

POSTPHLEBITIC AND VARICOSE VENOUS STASIS: CLINICAL RESULTS OF TREATMENT BY PULSATILE AIR-PRESSURE PRINCIPLE

Author Affiliations

Rochester, N. Y.

From the Department of Surgery, The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

JAMA. 1951;147(13):1195-1201. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670300009003
Abstract

A disturbance in the return of venous blood and lymph from the subcutaneous region of the lower part of the legs is one of the commonest pathological conditions found in man. This expresses itself usually in one of two ways, namely, varicose veins or postphlebitic lymphedema. It is difficult to obtain precise figures for the incidence of these conditions, but any physician who treats adult patients knows the extreme frequency of their occurrence. In a survey of 1,000 young industrial employees, it was found that 10% had definite varicose veins. In an older group of department store employees, all over 40, the incidence had risen to 40% among the men and 70% among the women.1 The corresponding figures for postphlebitic lymphedema cannot be cited, but this is an extremely prevalent condition.

VARICOSE VEINS  In the development of varicose veins the superficial veins enlarge because of the incompetence of their

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