[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
November 24, 1951

INTEGRATED TEACHING IN THE BASIC SCIENCES: REPORT ON FIVE YEARS' EXPERIENCE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1951;147(13):1221-1223. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670300035008
Abstract

The Flexner report on "Medical Education in the United States and Canada"1 marked a turning point in the history of American medical schools. Among other things, Flexner found that, at the time of his report, the laboratory sciences were too much subordinated to clinical teaching. This defect was gradually corrected by the schools. However, the Commonwealth Fund, in its annual report of 1950, has noted that the pendulum has now swung to the other extreme and that these sciences now stand too much alone, so that their relation to clinical judgment is often left unclear in the student's mind. The Commonwealth Fund report emphasizes that... the first two years of medical school are characteristically split into discontinuous fragments and that the student is given little help in putting them together. In the poorer schools one department may neither know nor care what another teaches. Even in the better ones,

×