[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.226.244.70. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 22, 1951

VITAMIN K, EMULSIONS IN BISHYDROXYCOUMARIN EMERGENCIES: RESULTS OF INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, and the Medical Clinics, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

JAMA. 1951;147(17):1652. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.73670340001010
Abstract

Recently an editorial in The Journal called attention to the dangers of anticoagulant therapy.1 Although use of protamine sulfate intravenously has minimized the danger of hemorrhage due to heparinization, there exists no comparable rapid treatment for the hypocoagulable state induced by bishydroxycoumarin (dicumarol®). Accordingly, the severe hemorrhages which have complicated anticoagulant therapy have occurred principally in patients receiving bishydroxycoumarin.

Various forms of vitamin K have been used to reverse bishydroxycoumarin-induced hypoprothrombinemia. The relative ineffectiveness of most of these preparations is indicated by the fact that responses to them (in terms of prothrombin time or per cent of normal activity) are usually reported at 24-hour intervals.

It is acknowledged that it is not necessarily desirable to reverse completely the excessively prolonged prothrombin times which may inadvertently follow use of bishydroxycoumarin. Yet when such hypocoagulability is associated with hemorrhage, there can be no question about the necessity for rapidly reversing the

×