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December 29, 1951

TREATMENT OF MENINGITIS BY INTRACISTERNAL INJECTION OF CHLORAMPHENICOL

Author Affiliations

São Paulo, Brazil

From the Department of Surgery of the Clinic Hospital and of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine; Dr. Trindade, senior assistant in surgery, and Dr. Nastari, junior assistant in surgery.

JAMA. 1951;147(18):1757-1759. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.73670350001010
Abstract

In 1947, Ehrlich and collaborators1 isolated Streptomyces venezuelae, N. sp., from a soil sample obtained near Caracas, Venezuela. Filtrates of S. venezuelae cultures were found to have marked antibiotic activity against several gram-negative bacteria, principally Shigella paradysenteriae (Sonne). This new antibiotic in crystalline form is a neutral compound, is stable in aqueous solution for over 24 hours at a pH 2 to 9, and in distilled water is unaffected by boiling for 5 hours. At 25 C its solubility in water is about 2.5 mg. per milliliter. It is very soluble in propylene glycol, butanol, ethanol, acetone, and ethyl acetate. In vitro tests against gram-negative organisms demonstrated the new antibiotic to be 7 to 36 times as active as penicillin and approximately 2 to 16 times as active as streptomycin. Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is approximately one-tenth as active as streptomycin.2 The drug showed remarkable tuberculostatic action3

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