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Article
May 10, 1952

CEREBRAL APOPLEXY DUE TO SPONTANEOUS INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE: REPORT OF TWENTY-THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Department of Neurosurgery, Temple University Hospital and Medical School and the Jewish Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;149(2):129-136. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930190031008
Abstract

The mortality from the "conservative" treatment of spontaneous nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage is discouraging to physicians who see other previously fatal conditions respond to newer techniques in surgery, to antibiotics, and to certain hormones. This type of hemorrhage may occur in the subarachnoid space, or it may originate in the cerebrum, but rarely in the subdural space.1 Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually caused by a leaking or ruptured aneurysm within or contiguous to the subarachnoid space. The diagnosis and treatment of this catastrophe, at times associated with hemorrhage into the brain substance, is a problem worthy of detailed discussion2 but is not the purpose of this paper. This presentation is primarily concerned with the results of surgical treatment of spontaneous hemorrhage into the brain substance, which in many instances causes symptoms of a "stroke."

It would be helpful to know, for comparison, what percentage of patients with proved intracerebral

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