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Article
May 10, 1952

THROMBOTIC OBLITERATION OF THE ABDOMINAL AORTA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Professor of Clinical Medicine, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University (Dr. Plice).

JAMA. 1952;149(2):142-143. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930190007009b
Abstract

The syndrome of thrombotic obliteration of the aortic bifurcation, first mentioned by Graham in 1814,1 has been firmly established clinically by Leriche and Morel.2 This condition has no relation to the commonly recognized "saddle embolus." It consists of a gradual occlusion of the lower abdominal aorta near the bifurcation, extending downward into the common iliac arteries. It sometimes originates in one common iliac artery, later extending to the other iliac artery and to the aorta. The process frequently extends upward and often obliterates the right renal artery. Most of the case reports have concerned young men who were unable to maintain an erection because of inadequate blood flow into the corpus spongiosa. Muscular fatigue of the legs is an associated condition. The following case report is submitted because it presented a difficult problem in differentiation from coarctation of the aorta, and also because the patient was a woman.

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