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Article
May 10, 1952

PRIMARY ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE ESOPHAGUS SIMULATING A BENIGN LESION

Author Affiliations

New York; Hackensack, N. J.

From the Otolaryngological and Radiologic Services of Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

JAMA. 1952;149(2):144-145. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930190009009d
Abstract

Primary adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is an uncommon finding. In a series of 89 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus recently reported,1 there occurred only one primary adenocarcinoma, the remainder of the lesions being squamous cell neoplasms. Garlock,2 whose experience with this type of lesion has been considerable, has seen but three primary adenocarcinomas of the esophagus. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus occurs invariably as a secondary extension of a gastric lesion by contiguous spread from the cardia. When adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is primary, the malignant development takes place in submucosal esophageal glands or in heterotopic gastric glands that may be present in the esophagus.

The following report is of a primary adenocarcinoma of the esophagus presenting the appearance of a benign submucosal lesion on x-ray examination. The diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm was made only after histopathological examination of tissue obtained by esophagoscopy.

REPORT OF A CASE 

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