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Article
May 17, 1952

LEPTOSPIRAL MENINGITIS: REPORT OF OUTBREAK AMONG AMERICAN TROOPS ON OKINAWA

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.
Army Medical Service Graduate School, Washington, D. C. (Dr. Gauld, Major Gochenour, and Lt. Col. Yager); formerly Captain (M C), 34th General Hospital, Okinawa (Dr. Crouch); formerly Lieutenant Colonel (M C), 34th General Hospital, Okinawa (Dr. Kaminsky); 406th Medical General Laboratory, Tokyo (Lt. Col. Hullinghorst).

JAMA. 1952;149(3):228-231. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930200014004
Abstract

Although leptospiral meningitis has been recognized for many years,1 it is only recently that the importance of leptospiral infection as an etiological factor in central nervous system disease has received attention in this country.2 Numerous cases of meningitis in both icteric and nonicteric cases of leptospirosis have been reported in the foreign literature, and some workers have described muscular weakness and transient paralysis, usually involving the lower extremities, associated with leptospirosis.3 In the United States, it has been customary to assume that patients who present the clinical picture of aseptic meningitis have virus infections; however, in a serologic survey, Beeson2 was able to show that 11 of 86 undiagnosed cases of aseptic meningitis were caused by leptospiral infection. Schaeffer4 has described a waterborne epidemic of leptospiral meningitis in which none of the patients had icterus. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to

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