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Article
June 28, 1952

DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS: REPORT NO. 2 OF THE NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL, COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC HEALTH ASPECTS OF BRUCELLOSIS

Author Affiliations

Chairman, Minneapolis; Bethesda, Md.; LaFayette, Ind.; Beltsville, Md.

JAMA. 1952;149(9):805-808. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930260007003
Abstract

Human brucellosis for the most part appears as a sporadic disease. For this reason, and also because the symptomatology simulates many other illnesses, a definite diagnosis of active disease can only be made with the aid of laboratory procedures. After careful evaluation of the problem of the diagnosis of human brucellosis, and after consultation with investigators in this field, this committee has attempted to crystallize the available information on the subject. This report has been prompted by the interest and misunderstanding manifested by the medical profession, and by the confusion that has been engendered by the current emphasis being placed on chronic brucellosis and the wide use of the intradermal test for diagnostic purposes. For the sake of brevity and clarity, no attempt has been made to document the statements made in this report.1 Critical clinical information now available has been summarized in the following statement.

ISOLATION OF BRUCELLA 

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