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Article
June 28, 1952

GASTRIC TRIDERMAL TERATOMA IN INFANCY: SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT BY SUBTOTAL GASTRECTOMY

Author Affiliations

Charlotte, N. C.; Thomasville, Ga.
From the Department of Pathology (Dr. Large) and the Department of Surgery (Drs. Williams and Neel), Charlotte Memorial Hospital. Dr. Large is now associated with the Presbyterian Hospital. Charlotte, N. C.

JAMA. 1952;149(9):824-826. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930260026008
Abstract

Only one case of benign teratoma originating from and confined to the wall of the stomach has been previously described.1 Ours is the second one of this type to be recorded.

REPORT OF A CASE  T. M., a 7-month-old infant, was admitted to the Charlotte Memorial Hospital on Dec. 22, 1950, because of hematemesis and melena. For two months the infant had been extremely pale. On Nov. 30, 1950, he vomited coffee ground material and passed a tarry stool. His local physician discovered pronounced anemia, for which the baby was admitted to a hospital elsewhere. Results of physical examination and x-rays of the gastrointestinal tract at that time were reported as normal. After two transfusions, the symptoms disappeared and the infant was taken home.Hemoptysis and melena reappeared a few days later, and the infant was readmitted to the Charlotte Memorial Hospital. Physical examination revealed a well-developed, well-nourished, slightly

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